The importance of solving the problem of childhood obesity

ShareCompartir Overview In the United States, the percentage of children and adolescents affected by obesity has more than tripled since the s.

The importance of solving the problem of childhood obesity

For some children, however, that adorable baby fat may turn into a health concern. Childhood obesity affects an enormous number of families around the world, but the vast majority of these cases are preventable—and can still be reversed.

The importance of solving the problem of childhood obesity

With support, encouragement, and positive role modeling, you can help your child reach and maintain a healthy weight. Those extra pounds put kids at risk for developing serious health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and asthma.

Childhood obesity also takes an emotional toll. Overweight children often have trouble keeping up with other kids and joining in sports and activities. Other kids may tease and exclude them, leading to low self-esteem, negative body image, and even depression.

Feb 13,  · Obesity in childhood can add up to health problems—often for life. In adults, overweight and obesity are linked to increased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes (high blood sugar), high blood pressure, certain cancers, and other chronic conditions. Childhood obesity is a major concern in the United States. Over the past few decades there has been a dramatic increase in the number of children suffering from obesity. Kids are staying indoors more with limited physical activity and increased caloric consumption, resulting in a nationwide epidemic of obesity in our children. The Importance of a Healthy Weight. Maintaining a healthy weight is an extremely important part of overall health. Being overweight or obese contributes to numerous health conditions that limit the quality and length of life, including.

Diagnosing weight problems and obesity in children as early as possible can reduce their risk of developing serious medical conditions as they get older.

Is your child overweight? Children grow at different rates at different times, so it is not always easy to tell if a child is overweight. Body mass index BMI uses height and weight measurements to estimate how much body fat a child has. However, while BMI is usually a good indicator, it is NOT a perfect measure of body fat and can even be misleading at times when children are experiencing periods of rapid growth.

If your child registers a high BMI-for-age measurement, your health care provider may need to perform further assessments and screenings to determine if excess fat is a problem. Causes of weight problems and obesity in children Understanding how children become overweight in the first place is an important step toward breaking the cycle.

Most cases of childhood obesity are caused by eating too much and exercising too little. Children need enough food to support healthy growth and development. But when they take in more calories than they burn throughout the day, the result is weight gain.

Causes of weight problems in children may include: Busy families cooking at home less and eating out more.

Easy access to cheap, high-calorie fast food and junk food. Bigger food portions, both in restaurants and at home.

The importance of solving the problem of childhood obesity

Kids consuming huge amounts of sugar in sweetened drinks and hidden in an array of foods. Kids spending less time actively playing outside, and more time watching TV, playing video games, and sitting at the computer. Many schools eliminating or cutting back their physical education programs.

Most kids can maintain a healthy weight if they eat right and exercise. Children who are obese or overweight should be put on a diet. The goal should be to slow or stop weight gain, allowing your child to grow into his or her ideal weight.

Children will outgrow the weight. The majority of children who are overweight at any time during the preschool or elementary school are still overweight as they enter their teens.

Most kids do not outgrow the problem. To combat weight problems, get the whole family involved Healthy habits start at home. The best way to fight or prevent childhood obesity and weight problems is to get the whole family on a healthier track.

Making better food choices and becoming more active will benefit everyone, regardless of weight. Spending time with your kids—talking about their day, playing, reading, cooking—can supply them with the self-esteem boost they may need to make positive changes.

Tell your child about the healthy food you are eating, while you are eating it. Cook healthily in front of your children. Better yet, give them an age-appropriate job in the kitchen.

Exercise in some way, every day. Be authentic—do things you enjoy. Avoid the television or too much computer time. Kids are much less likely to turn screens on if they are off and you are doing something they can get involved in.

Strategies for Real Life Recognize that you have more control than you might think. You can turn off the TV, computer, or video game. You can choose to get off the bus one stop earlier than usual and walk the rest of the way, especially when you are with your kids.Obesity has become an epidemic and an important public health concern.

Because the problem is multidimensional, the solution will require an interdisciplinary approach involving the cooperation of the food industry with other stakeholders, such as the government, academia, and health care providers.

Childhood Obesity and Weight Problems Childhood obesity: understanding the problem. Today, nearly 1 out of 4 children and teens in developed countries are overweight or obese.

Those extra pounds put kids at risk for developing serious health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and asthma. Childhood obesity also . Childhood obesity is a major concern in the United States. Over the past few decades there has been a dramatic increase in the number of children suffering from obesity.

Kids are staying indoors more with limited physical activity and increased caloric consumption, resulting in a nationwide epidemic of obesity in our children. Obesity in childhood can add up to health problems—often for life.

Adult Obesity Rates and Statistics

In adults, overweight and obesity are linked to increased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes (high blood sugar), high blood pressure, certain cancers, and other chronic conditions. Indeed, the fact that we can solve this problem fairly easily means that if we dawdle and don't, we ought to be ashamed of ourselves.

So here's what I'd like to see: So here's what I'd like to see: 1. The complex problems surrounding childhood obesity are the focus of SSW Assistant Professor Daniel Miller’s research.

In part three of a four-part series on the nation’s obesity epidemic, BU Today spotlights the innovative research taking place at BU to better understand and solve this health problem.

Schools Role in Childhood Obesity Crisis